How councils are using printed stickers

We’re often evangelising about the versatility of labels and printed stickers – while magazines and newspapers may be moving to digital formats, the tangible nature of the sticker and its myriad of uses means it’s going nowhere fast. In the news this week were two stories about new uses for printed stickers by councils.

Plymouth Council is using stickers to help residents correctly sort their rubbish and recycling ahead of an update to their service later this year. Each household is being given a bin with a sticker which tells them their collection day and what to put in each bin, and also has a space for them to write their house number, helping to combat the age old problem of missing bins.

By adding stickers to bins, Plymouth Council hope they will see an improvement in residents’ understanding of collections. Councillor Brian Vincent, said: “We want to give everyone clear guidelines about what to put out and when. Rubbish and recycling is important to most people in this city. People who ignore the guidelines have an impact on their neighbours and where they live, so we are making sure everyone is clear on what to do.”

Elsewhere, in Staffordshire, 10,000 fluorescent stickers are being distributed to lorry companies to help reduce the number of road accidents involving cyclists in the area. The stickers, which read ‘Cyclists Beware’, will be stuck on the back of heavy goods vehicles which often have a large blind spot.

Steph Cooley, from Staffordshire Fire and Rescue Service said: “Rising fuel costs and the higher profile now given to events such as the Tour de France, have resulted in an increase in the number of cyclists on our roads. We are eager to make our roads as safe as possible and we hope these stickers will act as a visual prompt that will make cyclists consider their positioning, particularly at the approach to junctions and roundabouts.”

Hague have been supplying printed labels on a roll for over 30 years, and can create custom designed stickers for virtually any surface.